E-Discovery Evolved: The Future of kCura's Relativity and E-Discovery Product Integrations

kCura's Relativity has grown into the main platform for e-discovery. Where has its evolution placed it amid the marketplace?

, Legaltech News

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kCura's Relativity has grown into the main platform for e-discovery. Where has its evolution placed it amid the marketplace?

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Originally appeared in print as E-Discovery Evolved

What's being said

  • Perry Marchant, VP of Engineering, kCura

    Thanks for your comment. I wanted to clarify that kCura has worked closely with Microsoft to ensure Azure will meet the needs of our partners and customers. We’ve been able to implement SQL 2016 on Azure IaaS—the same architecture used in the on-premises version of Relativity—to free us from those record limits, which are applicable to the PaaS version of SQL, Azure SQL. Of course, scalability of the architecture aside, we definitely agree that law firms and corporations may not want to invest in their own instance of the software, and that the vast majority of cases are still large and complex enough that service providers will be adding tons of value, whether they’re using Relativity on-premises or in the cloud.

  • Orange Status Hosting Partner

    RelativityOne still has a long way to go. Microsoft‘s Azure platform does not support SQL instances large enough to reliably host Relativity databases with over 1 million records. Unless Microsoft makes significant changes to their IaaS and PaaS offerings in Azure, or kCura expedites a transition to a NoSQL backend beyond ElasticSearch, the larger hosting partners are going to be fine for a few more years. Law firms do not want to make the sizeable infrastructure investments required to host large matters in house. Smaller hosting partners cannot afford the regulatory and compliance costs of hosting the large cases.

  • confused

    First sentence of paragraph four makes ZERO sense...

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